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Travelling South America overland

  • Most border crossings in South America are open and can be crossed quite easily
  • Problematic border crossings are mostly in the less populated areas
  • Some border crossings do not have the immigration offices at the border but in the first town
  • You always will have to receive an exit stamp from the departing country and an entry stamp from the entering country
  • In most South American countries you can get a tourist Visa up to 90 days
  • Often only 30 days is given


This large continent consists out of 13 countries and hence hundreds of overland border crossings. Brazil, being the largest country, shares borders with 10 of these countries, several of these located in the Amazon Rainforest. In general border crossings in South America are very busy and can be quite hectic. Therefore it is important to maintain calm, keep an eye on your belongings and make sure that you do not lose anything. Most of the time the border crossing will mean filling out a form, standing in line to obtain your exit stamp and continue to the order side of the border to fill out the immigration form, obtain and entrance stamp and that’s it. Nevertheless depending from nationality to nationality there can be other requirements involved. Some countries require visas for US citizens (Brazil and Bolivia for instance) as some do not. Some countries provide the possibility to obtain these visas at the crossing, and other will not provide any visa services at the border. As several of these regulations depend on the foreign affairs of these countries and the alliances of the moment, the regulations and the country they apply to can change without much warning. Therefore it is very important to get the latest information from your country’s ministry of foreign affairs. Most governments have an updated website for consultation available. For the USA the website is; http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_4965.html

 

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